Cartesian Conscientia.

The article argues that philosopher René Descartes did not introduce the concept of "conscientia" which may mean "consciousness" or "conscience." The author claims that the philosopher used the term "conscientia" to refer to an attribute of the one who is &quo...

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Published in:British Journal for the History of Philosophy Vol. 15; no. 3; pp. 455 - 485
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Format: Article
Published: Taylor & Francis Ltd, Aug2007
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