Urine drug screening: A guide to monitoring Tx with controlled substances.

Addiction is a highly stigmatized disease, and patients might simply be ashamed to admit that they need treatment: 13% to 38% of patients receiving chronic opioid therapy in a pain management or primary care setting have a clinically diagnosable SUD. 1 Used appropriately, UDS can be a valuable tool;...

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Published in:Journal of Family Practice Vol. 70; no. 3; pp. 112 - 121
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Format: Article
Published: Frontline Medical Communications, Apr2021
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Online Access:View this record in EBSCOhost
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Summary:Addiction is a highly stigmatized disease, and patients might simply be ashamed to admit that they need treatment: 13% to 38% of patients receiving chronic opioid therapy in a pain management or primary care setting have a clinically diagnosable SUD. 1 Used appropriately, UDS can be a valuable tool; there is ample evidence, however, that it has been misused, by some physicians, to stigmatize patients who use drugs of abuse, 2 profile patients racially, 2 profit from excessive testing, 3 and inappropriately discontinue treatment. IMAGE: © ALICIA BUELOW 114 THE JOURNAL OF FAMILY PRACTICE | APRIL 2021 | VOL 70, NO 3 Annual screening is appropriate in low-risk patients; moderate-risk patients should be screened twice a year, and high-risk patients should be screened at least every 4 months. Annual screening is appropriate in low-risk patients; moderate-risk patients should be screened twice a year, and high-risk patients should be screened at least every 4 months (FIGURE).